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Author Topic: compensating for relatively humidity  (Read 1206 times)

askthe coffeeguy

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compensating for relatively humidity
« on: 04/02/2017, 08:16 AM »
Hi folks,

as many of you will know I now live in a much warmer and more humid environment (than melbourne) - and i was just wondering what other folks in similar climates did to compensate for increased humidity, when grinding and making their coffee?

I tend to find that the beans are moisture rich already, and Im not convinced that a relatively fine grind and 'down-dosing' which seems to be the norm in 'hipster' cafes is necessarily the best way to go

thoughts people?

P


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Brett H

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compensating for relatively humidity
« Reply #1 on: 04/02/2017, 10:59 AM »
I'm now updosing (22g basket) and thus grinding a little coarser.  I've also swapped the VST for a Pesado Basket from Dolo which seems to be as good as the VST.  I leave my beans on the bench in the tins I covered a while back from Campos.  They're not cheap but they are holding up well and I think they make a difference to my consistency. 

In th end I think it is what is it is!  One man's symptomatic discrepancies is another man's Mother's Milk.
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askthe coffeeguy

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compensating for relatively humidity
« Reply #2 on: 04/02/2017, 11:57 AM »
Agree I seem to get the most out of my coffee on 22g slightly coaser grind - but that also suits the beans and the roast profile I'm guessing I would do things differently for a central American based blend on a lighter roast profile (for instance)

P

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cosmic_couple22

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compensating for relatively humidity
« Reply #3 on: 05/02/2017, 12:55 AM »
To avoid to many variables I stick with my 22 grams and make my adjustments for maintaining taste by way of grind, yield and extraction time.  The Slayer design also allows a bit more flavour control depending on how you use that paddle.
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askthe coffeeguy

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compensating for relatively humidity
« Reply #4 on: 05/02/2017, 03:44 AM »
To avoid to many variables I stick with my 22 grams and make my adjustments for maintaining taste by way of grind, yield and extraction time.  The Slayer design also allows a bit more flavour control depending on how you use that paddle.

Oh must be great to have all those added variables to play with!  Does manual control of the flow rate mean that you can dial the grind in a lot finer (than other espresso machines) ?
"The crema which dissipates is not the lasting crema..."

Bezzera

 

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