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Author Topic: Grinding and bean hardness :)  (Read 273 times)

Simon

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Grinding and bean hardness :)
« on: 04/09/2017, 07:06 PM »
Hey guys, just read a really thought provoking thread on HB, and whilst not going to take as absolute, will definitely keep it in mind. It's mainly Jim Schulman's responses that are fascinating...

In a nutshell, with coffees with a higher bean density/brittleness it would be better to grind coarser which produces less fines (which blocks up espresso shots and can cause channelling etc), and softer beans a finer grind/higher dose due to less fines present in softer beans. Grinding finer to produce enough fines so the shot doesn't gush towards the end.

All new stuff to hear for me anyways! :)


https://www.home-barista.com/tips/help-me-understand-why-some-coffees-are-so-hard-to-work-with-t15162.html


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Brett H

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Grinding and bean hardness :)
« Reply #1 on: 04/09/2017, 07:50 PM »
Sounds good in theory. In practice varying the doseage  to cope with those variables surely puts us right back at square one: what's in the cup that matters.
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askthe coffeeguy

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Grinding and bean hardness :)
« Reply #2 on: 04/09/2017, 08:37 PM »
I think it makes sense if you're talking about single estate coffees only and depending upon how they've been processed I mean a lot of the african beans are 'hard' and dry processed so I could se how this would have an impact but in most instances they're blended with wet processed beans (from wetter countries) to even out the blend - so then what do you do?

seperate out the beans and grind then separately and then blend them to order for each coffee that you make - dont laugh its only a matter if time until some melbourne hipster does it
 :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

p
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Simon

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Grinding and bean hardness :)
« Reply #3 on: 04/09/2017, 09:41 PM »
Sounds good in theory. In practice varying the doseage  to cope with those variables surely puts us right back at square one: what's in the cup that matters.
Yeah I was thinking that... and I don't think it would work well with my grinder to be honest (going alot coarser or finer), maybe working just with flow rate and depth of basket filled may be more efficient when working with specific beans.. but yeah it's really hard to generalise, and would come down to the individual bean. Definitely cool to keep in mind as a possible variable.

I'm learning very quickly that it's a much more fluid and intuitive process, and comes down to the individual beans in whatever conditions they find themselves in. And the end result in the cup for sure.

As someone I know once said (some guys here may know), when it comes to coffee, 2+2= 5 ;)
I think it makes sense if you're talking about single estate coffees only and depending upon how they've been processed I mean a lot of the african beans are 'hard' and dry processed so I could se how this would have an impact but in most instances they're blended with wet processed beans (from wetter countries) to even out the blend - so then what do you do?

seperate out the beans and grind then separately and then blend them to order for each coffee that you make - dont laugh its only a matter if time until some melbourne hipster does it
 :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

p
Yeah true regarding blended, and hahaha I wouldn't be surprised! I only really wheel an deal with single origins, but fair point!
Profitec Pro 500, Rancilio Rocky Doser Grinder, 58.5mm Pullman Tamper, V60, Aeropress, Plunger, Behmor 1600

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