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Greek / Turkish Coffee

About 45 years ago is my best guess
Greek / Turkish style of coffee was my first introduction to the brown bean

My grandma would also roast the beans on a tin fry pan

Its still a part of my life even today

I believe that this the first brewing method that is still used today
Its also consumed by more people than espresso styles

Its simple to make and also has many variants from different countries not unlike espresso variants

I just simply want to advertise the fact that its a wonderful coffee to consume

KK

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Comments

  • Its simple to make and also has many variants from different countries not unlike espresso variants
    Simple maybe, but there's definitely an art to it. I really enjoy coffee prepared this way and I find it to be a very social drink, especially if everyone is standing or sitting around watching the coffee pot do it's thing.
  • on 1302838620:
    Simple maybe, but there's definitely an art to it. I really enjoy coffee prepared this way and I find it to be a very social drink, especially if everyone is standing or sitting around watching the coffee pot do it's thing.
    It definitely social Lovey Our Australian lifestyle & climate lends itself beautifully to this style of coffee I think that when Australia was colonised by England, tea was the drink of choice and for convenience Espresso took hold when  the Australian pallet craved a new direction May need to research into it a little more ? KK
  • KK, So how does one brew Greek/Turkish Coffee?  I vagely remember seeing a how to in beanscene mag a while ago. My other half came home from the markets with bargain of the week  ::) a little copper jug looking thing.  She said it was a turkish coffee pot,  but I can't see how you could make a coffee in it.
  • on 1302846558:
    KK, So how does one brew Greek/Turkish Coffee?  I vagely remember seeing a how to in beanscene mag a while ago. My other half came home from the markets with bargain of the week  ::) a little copper jug looking thing.  She said it was a turkish coffee pot,  but I can't see how you could make a coffee in it.
    Depending on how large the pot is in volume Basic Recipe & making directions 1 per person X raised teaspoon of Greek/Turkish coffee Measure water in the demitasse cups you will be drinking from and add one full cup per teaspoon of coffee Sugar can be added to the brew or used afterwards If you want to add it now to brew add 1 teaspoon per person Stir well and briskly as this may be one of the few times you will stir Place on heat and bring it up to " almost boil" and you can swirl not stir the liquid if required You will see the crema almost boiling over so you need to pre-empt the rise and raise the Briki from the heat Once the crema falls back down - place the Briki on the heat again Repeat again bring to boil and raise off the heat Pour the brewed coffee immediately in the demitasse cups a little in each going back and forth until the crema and devide it equally in each cup Leave to settle and cool for a minute or so Drink only the top thin liquid and leave the grinds that have settled in the cup Regards KK
  • Cool, thanks KK. That's why I couldn't get my head around it.  I could imagine drinking a heap of groud coffee with every mouthful.  I'll give it a go soon.
  • ROTFLMAO.  Good one. I think KK's guide will help.  I have to admit I don't know if this thing is suppose to be used or not.  It's copper, a bit green inside.  Might need a good trial run before a taste test.  Anyway it looks the part with all the coffee contraptions. Maybe I'll give the kids the mud.  They are always constipated! :)
  • Give the copper a scrub and shine Then you will be ready to start your journey What AM has said is true Never Drink The mud  Most cultures have a coffee cup reader in every family They read your future in the remaining coffee mud The cup is prepared for reading by the owner/drinker of the cup by first swirling & tipping the cup upside down into the saucer The coffee mud dries over the next  few minutes and creates intricate patterns These river-like patterns inside the cup are read by the coffee cup readers  KK
  • I picked up a Hon hand held brass Turkish coffee grinder from Naturally on High for $35 - which makes beautifully fine coffee - fine enough for Turkish, and excellent build quality which will last a lifetime!  only thing is that it takes ten minutes to grind enough for one coffee - but I can tell you its worth waiting for!
  • I enjoy Greek/Turkish coffee immensely And for a very small equipment cost its not hard to see why its so popular in Europe, Africa and the Middle east That in turn has been transplanted with migration to all parts of the world in a similar way to espresso KK
  • Any rules/guidelines for beginners to learn the basics before messing around a bit? Mainly quantities - teaspoon and demitasse cups vary in size. Anyone have coffee in gram to water in ml ratios? I have tried a couple of times before and got good results but just from winging it. Much better than from places that serve it but I think it was due to my beans at home being fresh roast and fresh ground. Cheers
  • Its all relative with this style of coffee against your taste preference You get you favourite cup This cup is the the basis of your water volume Add coffee & sugar to taste preference & starting at 1 tea spoon of each  + or - Just don't boil in the brewing stage as noted in my instructions above On the basis of what I have said in this post I have been offered coffee that has been to strong or to sweet This is the time to add some water to it from the glass that is normally offered with the coffee KK
  • Thanks KK, I think I was putting too much in. I tried the method of two demitasse cups and 2 heaped teaspoons. This worked out as 135ml of water and 8g of coffee. Seemed much nicer, now to play around! Cheers
  • I just tried Turkish coffee for the first time ever. Simply ground super fine, two teaspoons in a large cup/mug, poured over 95 degree water (I have a jug that stops before boiling), stir, and wait to settle out. It was amazing. By far the best black coffee I've ever had. Even the wife enjoyed it!
  • on 1319795489:
    I just tried Turkish coffee for the first time ever. Simply ground super fine, two teaspoons in a large cup/mug, poured over 95 degree water (I have a jug that stops before boiling), stir, and wait to settle out. It was amazing. By far the best black coffee I've ever had. Even the wife enjoyed it!
    I am pleased that you enjoyed this style of coffee You are not alone as many millions of people also enjoy it on a daily basis KK
  • As we always say for espresso Fresh beans and correct grind also applies to Greek/Turkish style coffee My preference is to roast light to the pseudo cracks of second crack This produces a rust coloured grind ( and I feel its just right to please ones pallet) The grind is important The consistency " is " (not should be) like White flour / or Talcum powder I use a stone flour mill similar to this (see image) to grind on demand for a fresh brew http://www.skippygrainmills.com.au/hand.htm survivalArk.jpg KK
  • This is a style of coffee that I am keen to try at some stage. I may even get around to buying some gear to try at home. I like the idea of bring the brew up to just short of a boil then taking it off the heat. Is it a matter of just trying out how many times to do this to suit my taste??
  • on 1325050904:
    This is a style of coffee that I am keen to try at some stage. I may even get around to buying some gear to try at home. I like the idea of bring the brew up to just short of a boil then taking it off the heat. Is it a matter of just trying out how many times to do this to suit my taste??
    Bring it up to just short of the boil - once or twice is enough Some go to a third for good luck It costs very little to set up KK
  • Any tips on best beans for this style of coffee (or beans that don't generally work well)? Currently I have PNG Bannum Wo, malawi nyika, MM and some very lightly roasted harfusa. I just got a suitable pot (about 300ml capacity), so will give it a go later today.
  • on 1331598901:
    Any tips on best beans for this style of coffee (or beans that don't generally work well)? Currently I have PNG Bannum Wo, malawi nyika, MM and some very lightly roasted harfusa. I just got a suitable pot (about 300ml capacity), so will give it a go later today.
    Best beans are Africans and Brazil or a combination of both My personal preference is to roast to first snaps of second crack When one views the ground coffee I personalty like the appearance of rust colour Grind to talcum powder,flour consistency for best results KK
  • This is a good video [embed=425,349] KK
  • Watched the video. Seems like the voice on that came from some computer generated software - just sounded so weird! Doesn't help they were speaking in American English of course. I also saw the first pour of coffee hit the boil  due to the metal being hotter at the rim. I think I need to get a real Briki, rather than a milk jug as the broader base and lack of height probably don't help.  Was a bit surprised nowhere seemed to sell them, but they had pallet loads of preground greek coffee. Wonder if my new grinder can grind fine enough (doubt it). Another question. Is there such a thing as too fine a grind?
  • Head down to a Greek deli close to you and you will find a briki for sale Nothing is stopping you from getting a bag of coffee to practice on  :thumb:
    Another question. Is there such a thing as too fine a grind?
    No this style is the finest I used to have a stone grinder normally used for grinding flour However a mortar and pestle will finish the job if you think your grind is to course KK
  • So I had a success with turkish coffee today. Approx 12gram coffee to 120ml water and  1/4tsp of maple syrup to sweeten slightly (any more and I have found it tastes too sweet) When the coffee first started to rise, I lifted a bit off the heat and then when the foam reached the lip of the briki, poured the foam into cups. Then returned to heat and got it to rise again and poured second batch to top up the cups. Worked better this way and I got plenty of 'crema' in the cup. Of course having a correctly shaped briki helped. I think slightly less coffee to water ratio would probably be better, but 1:10 was easy to measure.
  • on 1335322081:
    So I had a success with turkish coffee today. Approx 12gram coffee to 120ml water and  1/4tsp of maple syrup to sweeten slightly (any more and I have found it tastes too sweet) When the coffee first started to rise, I lifted a bit off the heat and then when the foam reached the lip of the briki, poured the foam into cups. Then returned to heat and got it to rise again and poured second batch to top up the cups. Worked better this way and I got plenty of 'crema' in the cup. Of course having a correctly shaped briki helped. I think slightly less coffee to water ratio would probably be better, but 1:10 was easy to measure.
    Very good  :thumb: A little practice goes a long way KK
  • Just came across this story on the Internet Remember the  expression
  • We know where your allegiances lie KK  :) Perhaps the article was sponsored by the Ikaria Tourist Bureau ??? But also keep this in mind:
  • Because this a coffee forum I like to believe that there is some measure of validity to the beneficial effects of coffee  :thumb: KK
  • I posted this my personal  method of brewing on the US Homeroasters Forum and forgot about posting it here Some research was made on the net for the historical additions This is a guide to Greek / Turkish Coffee I wrote it from experience and some extra & helpful information from others & even some from internet research Hope you find it informative About Greek/Turkish Coffee: Equipment The necessary equipment to prepare Greek/Turkish coffee consists of a narrow-topped small boiling pot called an ibrik, cezve, dzezva, xhezve or br
  • Thanks KK, you've just motivated me to clean mine ibrik (wife bought it from a market) and try this. :) Any chance of a photo or 2 off your ibrik's or a coffee brewed in one?  Sometimes a photo helps so that you can compare your results with others. :)
  • on 1363843573:
    Thanks KK, you've just motivated me to clean mine ibrik (wife bought it from a market) and try this. :) Any chance of a photo or 2 off your ibrik's or a coffee brewed in one?  Sometimes a photo helps so that you can compare your results with others. :)
    Is the passion and motivation still there ? Photo of my Brikis Attachment not found.
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