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PergTamp

edited January 1970 in Accessories
Hi all,

Has anyone or is anyone using the PergTamp as designed and patented by Matt Perger?

I found the measurements and sizes quite interesting when Matt was posting about it during development and wondered whether it only suits certain baskets. I get that you really should get as close of a size match with your tamp and basket. My tamp and basket that came with the Rancilio Silvia is barely an ok fit. I find after tamping, I have to brush the edges of the basket to remove the grinds up the wall of it. I then lightly, with no pressure spin the tamper back on top of the grinds to polish the top again.

Just wanting to hear peoples thoughts on it. Cheers.

Happy Saturday everyone.

Comments

  • Morning MH, The PergTamp was announced with much fanfare and hullabaloo, in a thread on another forum toward the end of June 2014, the thread struggled on until the end of August, since then there seems to have been little or no interest in the tamper. It was supposedly developed for use with VST basket, the statement was made that it was not suited to any brand of basket other than the VST. Some of the quotes re the device were quite humorous.     "Never place the Pergtamp on a hard surface, drop it on the floor or hit the edge against hard objects. This will eventually bend the edge, changing the diameter and resulting in a tight fit, jamming, or uneven tamping"     "Always pull the Pergtamp out of the basket slowly. Although the tapered sides increase airflow, there is still a vacuum effect if removed quickly. Watch out for any cracks appearing in the surface of the coffee grinds; this indicates that you are removing the tamper too quickly, and air is being forced up through the grinds instead of around the edges of the tamper"     "This tamper will not fit in or work well with any other brand of basket. You shouldn
  • Not sure how I missed this thread but never to late to add something. Did a lot of reading on this tamper, participated in the heated thread on another forum where the attitude towards innovation and competing professional baristas is rather hostile and unsupportive.  WHAT how dare you develop a product that we don't sell that actually works. And in my opinion that's exactly what this product does. Yes it is designed around VST baskets and their very uniform and straight side walls.  It was designed with the intention of a nutating tamping style hence the sizing at 58.4mm. Yes it does work fine using a traditional straight tamp but if this is your style the Big Step tamp also made by Pullman at 58.7mm (also designed exclusively for VST baskets) is better in this tamping motion. Does the Perg Tamp compress more grinds, simply Yes after many hundreds of tamps side by side with a standard (sized at 58.3mm) Pullman Barista tamper (at home and in a commercial caf
  • http://sensorylabproshop.com.au/collections/pergtamp Pretty difficult to sell a product when you have no stock, no explanation of when new stock available, simply "sold out"
  • Must mean it's a great product and was well supported by the coffee community. Don't quite get the point of your post  DB doesn't bring anything constructive to the conversation, plenty of retailers both online and in-store sell out of product and just put up a sold out sign. The few times I have mentioned Matt Perger you have been quick to question or doubt his intention, didn't think were that type of forum. My post is a factual evaluation of a product I tested to hep the original posters question, and has no basis of whether I like or agree with the thoughts or products that Matt brings to the industry.
  • on 1421831586:
    Must mean it's a great product and was well supported by the coffee community. Don't quite get the point of your post  DB doesn't bring anything constructive to the conversation, plenty of retailers both online and in-store sell out of product and just put up a sold out sign. The few times I have mentioned Matt Perger you have been quick to question or doubt his intention, didn't think were that type of forum. My post is a factual evaluation of a product I tested to hep the original posters question, and has no basis of whether I like or agree with the thoughts or products that Matt brings to the industry.
    The Pergtamp is simply a derivative of the ongoing VST debate, your either a believer or your not, as is my right, I don't happen to support either camp. I'm wondering what type of forum you feel this is Chester, surely we're not expected to fall into step behind an opinion simply because it's promulgated by a person in the industry. There are any number of things we agree on, this is simply not one of them.  :-)
  • Calm down peoples, it's only a tamper.
  • "I'm wondering what type of forum you feel this is Chester, surely we're not expected to fall into step behind an opinion simply because it's promulgated by a person in the industry." I absolutely agree with you DB, never accept anything without questioning, researching and making an informed decision, my only gripe was the post in reference to available stock, seemed more like a dig rather than healthy debate of the usefulness or merit of the product. All's good Lacehim, don't believe either myself or DB are hot under the collar. Chester
  • on 1421838324:
    my only gripe was the post in reference to available stock, seemed more like a dig rather than healthy debate of the usefulness or merit of the product. All's good Lacehim, don't believe either myself or DB are hot under the collar. Chester
    Yep, your right, it was indeed a dig, I've spent a good part of my life in the wholesale/retail industry, to run out of stock of an (innovative) Aussie made product and not inform potential customers when new stocks will be available is inexcusable. "don't believe either myself or DB are hot under the collar." Also right Chester, I'm certainly far from hot under the collar, nothing like a little civilised debate to maintain interest in a thread.
  • You may find the stock out situation is not a simple or easy problem to resolve. Typically, these things are made up in minimum quantities of 150 - 500 at a time which means a high capital outlay and long (read very) lead times of up to months.
  • on 1421842670:
    You may find the stock out situation is not a simple or easy problem to resolve.
    Certainly not in Australia, bet if you handed the Chinese a sample they would have 500 units made and ready for delivery within days. Mind you as a retailer I very much doubt I would want 500 Pergtamps sitting on my shelf, I very much doubt they would be fast movers.
  • tamp may be fine and well but please excuse my gag reflex when I read this from the same website: http://mattperger.com/The-Downward-Spiral-of-Death About Consulting Next Here
  • So, we should all rush out and buy a refractometer.rolls eyes.
  • Nope, unless you have a line of customers at your door paying you for your competitive edge and your consistency irrespective of 50 or 300 coffees in a row. I appreciate oh guys at the cutting edge Pat because I learn and I appreciate.  I too have no idea how long a piece of string is but its good to know that the end keeps disappearing over the horizon... Like the rainbow.  I don't even use a thermocouple for roasting any more but I still appreciate folks who post their roast profiles!  Sharing the knowledge is sharing the power!
  • I tend to agree with BrettH, we would still be in caves if nobody pushed the boundaries of thinking and common practice.  I have dialled in coffee with taste buds then used the same bean and dialled in with a refractometer and tasted an improvement.  Do we need it in our home coffee making, No but still a nice to do on an occasion to gain a benchmark on how well the taste buds are working (if you have access to one).  Again as BrettH infers, if running a busy coffee house checking where your at with extraction would assist in quality control.
  • If your entire business is built upon marketing spin, and self proclaimed "pushing the boundaries", then it is vital to continue posting, blogging and being a media whore to ensure that your disciples do not stray from the path that you, the "coffee messiah" has deemed to be the only path to enlightenment. No thanks. And a definite No to the highly acidic coffees on offer. While they all say they do not want any roast flavours, the problem is the coffee being served is underdeveloped, acidic and completely lacking in body. I prefer a Peter Wolff roasted coffee.
  • on 1422686253:
    If your entire business is built upon marketing spin, and self proclaimed "pushing the boundaries", then it is vital to continue posting, blogging and being a media whore to ensure that your disciples do not stray from the path that you, the "coffee messiah" has deemed to be the only path to enlightenment. No thanks. And a definite No to the highly acidic coffees on offer. While they all say they do not want any roast flavours, the problem is the coffee being served is underdeveloped, acidic and completely lacking in body. I prefer a Peter Wolff roasted coffee.
    dont get me wrong I'm a great believer in diagnostic tools as an insight into the roast profile / coffee making process, but when instruments start to replace palate structure and individual evaluation, then I believe that we run the risk of over complicating and taking all of the fun out of something that should be a visceral and ethereal process I learnt my trade (coffee and wine) from some of the finest minds and palates in the country and something that was drummed into me from an early age was to trust and to 'back your palate,' and I still believe that this is sage advice today! P
  • on 1422681927:
    Do we need it in our home coffee making, No but still a nice to do on an occasion to gain a benchmark on how well the taste buds are working (if you have access to one). 
    What course of action do we need to take if the refractometer tells us our taste buds are defective, order a new set of taste buds, or perhaps get rid of the infernal machine? If you taste buds tell you the coffee is enjoyable, what more do you need, alter the brew to fit the technical data even though it does not suit your palate?
  • Plenty of people enjoy there instant and pod coffee and we take opportunity within forums such as ours to state that there is far better quality coffee to consume and by indulging in quality coffee develop an understanding and a palette to appreciate the finer browns. (Should we just bite our tongue then) So why doesn't that also apply to us as well, the more we taste different origins and different roast profiles we develop our taste buds.  I taste salts ,sours and other concoctions to develop those little buggers in my mouth so I can learn to identify all those fine notes that exist, a refractometer can support this.  Cupping is  another method that is also very important to roasting but we don't dismiss that. Plenty of science out there to support the argument of TDS of 20% - 22% results in great flavour profiles.  At no point have I said throw your taste buds away, most important tool I have, but also means I need to make sure they are operating properly. Ask a smoker to identify flavours, eat a curry and see how good your coffee is, so many factors to influence your palette. As I said before, in a commercial environment a refractometer has it's place both for the roaster and the barista/caf
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