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Espro calibrated tampers

edited January 1970 in Accessories
I've read a few discussions on tampers here, but haven't seen anything about the Espro calibrated tampers. Has anyone used one? I was thinking that it would be a good one for new starters until they were used to getting the right pressure during tamping.

Comments

  • on 1461648798:
    I've read a few discussions on tampers here, but haven't seen anything about the Espro calibrated tampers. Has anyone used one? I was thinking that it would be a good one for new starters until they were used to getting the right pressure during tamping.
    They're not adjustable so yeah, probably more of a training tool. I haven't used one myself but have investigated them. Most people tended to say they were well made, but you move passed them when you become more experienced.
  • on 1461648798:
    I've read a few discussions on tampers here, but haven't seen anything about the Espro calibrated tampers. Has anyone used one? I was thinking that it would be a good one for new starters until they were used to getting the right pressure during tamping.
    I'm not a fan Werks, pretty much like training wheels on a bike, you quickly outgrow them, buy a decent tamper first up and learn how to use it, not a difficult thing to do. :)
  • I'm a big fan of the concept art adjustable pressure tampers especially in a commercial situation where sometimes a bit of added tamping pressure can make all the difference between a good and a great extraction - and because they're easilly adjustable it's a straight forward manoeuvre to make changes on the fly - great for home use as well !
  • Thanks all, I was considering getting one - or the Aussie Eazytamp (which is adjustable, self levels and you can lock it out, but no audible click). I really like the idea of removing as many variables as possible, but was also torn by the - well, just practice and get the tamping right - thought pattern!
  • Different schools of thought Werks, I'm sure both have merit. Pullman make very nice tampers right here in OZ https://www.google.com.au/search?q=pullman+tamper&biw=1344&bih=738&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&sqi=2&ved=0ahUKEwiTnZPW2q3MAhVKEpQKHelWCZgQsAQILQ However my preference is for the Reg Barber offering http://www.coffeetamper.com/ down to personal taste, both will do the same job. Whatever you do don't be tempted by a ripple or concave/convex base, flat is the way to go. :)
  • Tampers are very personal things. We had a head barista that used an espro clicker all the time, her coffees were excellent, and she really like that tamper. On the other hand I only used one a couple of times just to see what i thought, and I didnt go for it. That however doesnt necessarily mean anything, because it could just be that I didnt give the tamper a fair enough go to see if it might grow on me. I've used a number of tampers over the years and have settled on a simple no name flat based tamper. Works for me. And then as an individual, you get used to THAT tamper, which can then cloud your judgement when trying other tampers....unless you allow yourself the time to get used to them... I also think it depends for what purpose you are using any particular tamper. We have a variety of them at work and I have often pulled them all off the shelf and individually weighed them. I then put the heaviest ones back and make a mental note of the lighter ones for my own (possible) use. For home use at say 3 or 4 coffees a day, the heaviest tamper wont be a bother.....but if you are working as a bar rooster a very heavy tamper could well cause physical problems for individuals especially smaller/shorter individuals. Over time, your technique will become consistent no matter which tamper you use. Just some things to think on, and it basically comes down to "if you like it, use it, and if you dont, dont"  ;) Additionally, stated in different ways above in reference to adjustability of tamp pressure, but I will try to be more direct: Different people use different techniques in their coffee making, meaning that some  will tamp harder or softer than others. In actuality, it doesnt matter what pressure you use, as long as you become CONSISTENT at that pressure and have your grind setting and dose sorted for best results with your tamping pressure. ie...you dont have to use "specification" tamping pressure...you can use what ever you like, as long as your cuppas are good!
  • on 1461722430:
    Whatever you do don't be tempted by a ripple or concave/convex base, flat is the way to go. :)
    I love my Reg Barber tiger striped ripple base tamper and its my go to instrument of choice when making coffee in a commercial environment - the ripple effect could be all in my mind for all I care - its mainly about the size and weight of the tamper and ease of use plus im sure that it doesnt hurt that the ripple effect helps to prevent channeling by promoting even dispersement of water throughout the puck!  :stir :stir :thumb:
  • And rising to your bait Pat, here is a quick non-techincal, technical note  :) Individuals need to decide for themselves, at what point they stop specifying/buying equipment for their own use. Its the same as hifi gear, camera gear etc etc etc., and I say that because it really is quite apparent that people buy stuff that is way past their level of expertise and or the level where the equipment has actually stopped adding any benefit to the individual's (in this case) coffee. Case in point, expensive tampers with "fancy" design features. I have no doubt that under controlled conditions "fancy" tampers offer something more in the process of coffee making, but the point really is, where do the curves cross over between cost and benefit. If a simple but well made no name tamper costs say $60.00, and a brand name tamper with special design feature costs say $160.00, and the home use non professional owner has absolutely no way of being able to judge or measure the difference in performance between the two tampers that the more expensive one is supposed to offer, its probably not a very good investment...?? This sentiment of course goes right throughout the entire equipment business, with many people buying thiings that are *said* to do all manner of stuff for them, that most have no way of judging or measuring or even knowing if it is doing what it is *supposed* to do, but where you pay an aweful lot of extra  money to get it. Just an open thought for your discussion. Of course, people should buy what they like, I just reckon they should have their eyes open rather than shut when thinking on this. Please note, this is not to say that people should just buy cheap stuff....not at all ! People should always buy quality, and I am simply pointing out that there may sometimes be only very small differences (if they are discernible at all in individual use) between items of already known good quality, and other items that are said to offer something more for a far greater cost....we dont all drink coffee in a laboratory and have the palate of an industry professional coffee cupper. Careful not to mistake the sizzle for the sausage  :) All that said...the click tamper offers something where you can see what you are getting for the money, which is the specified tamping pressure. Suggest you handle one in a shop and see how you like the feel of it.
  • on 1461797847:
    And rising to your bait Pat, here is a quick non-techincal, technical note  :) Individuals need to decide for themselves, at what point they stop specifying/buying equipment for their own use. Its the same as hifi gear, camera gear etc etc etc., and I say that because it really is quite apparent that people buy stuff that is way past their level of expertise and or the level where the equipment has actually stopped adding any benefit to the individual's (in this case) coffee. Case in point, expensive tampers with "fancy" design features. I have no doubt that under controlled conditions "fancy" tampers offer something more in the process of coffee making, but the point really is, where do the curves cross over between cost and benefit. If a simple but well made no name tamper costs say $60.00, and a brand name tamper with special design feature costs say $160.00, and the home use non professional owner has absolutely no way of being able to judge or measure the difference in performance between the two tampers that the more expensive one is supposed to offer, its probably not a very good investment...?? This sentiment of course goes right throughout the entire equipment business, with many people buying thiings that are *said* to do all manner of stuff for them, that most have no way of judging or measuring or even knowing if it is doing what it is *supposed* to do, but where you pay an aweful lot of extra  money to get it. Just an open thought for your discussion. Of course, people should buy what they like, I just reckon they should have their eyes open rather than shut when thinking on this. Please note, this is not to say that people should just buy cheap stuff....not at all ! People should always buy quality, and I am simply pointing out that there may sometimes be only very small differences (if they are discernible at all in individual use) between items of already known good quality, and other items that are said to offer something more for a far greater cost....we dont all drink coffee in a laboratory and have the palate of an industry professional coffee cupper. Careful not to mistake the sizzle for the sausage  :) All that said...the click tamper offers something where you can see what you are getting for the money, which is the specified tamping pressure. Suggest you handle one in a shop and see how you like the feel of it.
    Thanks A, well said, I really didn't feel motivated to respond. :head:
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