There's an awful lot of coffee in Columbia. - Have your say - Coffee Forum


Coffee Forum

Please login or register.

BeanRoasters

Author Topic: There's an awful lot of coffee in Columbia.  (Read 1283 times)

Dry bean.

  • Global Moderator
  • Old Coffee Fella
  • *****
  • Posts: 1713
  • Gender: Male
  • Bezerra Galatea - Mazzer Mini - La Pavoni Lever
There's an awful lot of coffee in Columbia.
« on: 18/01/2015, 11:54 AM »
Here's an interesting read regarding the coffee situation in Columbia.
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/inside-the-worlds-most-advanced-coffee-laboratory

Particularly liked this quote ----

"


Cheers,

Dry Bean.

Old age and treachery always overcomes youth and skill. (Willie Nelson)

mycuppa

  • www.mycuppa.com.au
  • Sponsor
  • Old Coffee Fella
  • *****
  • Posts: 1119
  • Gender: Male
  • 30 Golden Bean & RAS Medals
    • www.mycuppa.com.au
There's an awful lot of coffee in Columbia.
« Reply #1 on: 18/01/2015, 12:50 PM »
An interesting read DB - thanks for the link.

Alas, the author is either short on research material/memory or is somewhat naive enough to believe everything being said.

Couple of key points really stand out......

1. Kenyan farmers are generally regarded as being a notch above the rest of the world in terms of quality and skills - with Costa Rican and a handful of Colombian farmers not far behind. It's been the case for the last 20 years now. Yes, I really respect and admire the Colombian farmers, but they still leverage practices developed and optimized by the Kenyans and Ethiopians.

2. Colombia did not avert Roya. In fact, 3+ years ago it almost destroyed up to 40% of the key plantations and it's what triggered the massive spike (almost doubling) in raw coffee pricing from May 2010 to Feb 2011 with the C-Index kissing that magic 300 mark. The good news is that Colombia was able to develop plans and implement risk mitigation strategies to survive in the future.

For that, Colombia deserve to be applauded. Some other Central American origins did not have the capital or infrastructure to take these measures, or they were blind in the belief that Roya could not affect them at such high elevations - history proved them wrong.

3. Coffee farming in Colombia is rather unorganised (to say it bluntly). It is split into a vast amount of separate departments. There are a lot of really small holders, e.g. high number of farms producing smaller quantities which make up the overall volume. It is not unusual to see families growing coffee in their own homes (land) as a supplement to their other sources of income.

4. What makes Colombia kinda special is that coffee is literally available all year round. This is remarkably different to other origins that have 2 crops a year, or a big and a small crop. The huge geographical area of Colombia means that coffee is being shipped constantly whereas you have to wait for what seems like forever with other origins if you miss the key buying window.

5. Colombia has come a long way in the last few years. Yes, I do believe they are perhaps making some of the best coffees and serious contenders to rival Kenya and Ethiopia, however, like all good coffees, the competition to buy these lots is insane (and at the same time utterly ridiculous).



Dry bean.

  • Global Moderator
  • Old Coffee Fella
  • *****
  • Posts: 1713
  • Gender: Male
  • Bezerra Galatea - Mazzer Mini - La Pavoni Lever
There's an awful lot of coffee in Columbia.
« Reply #2 on: 18/01/2015, 12:55 PM »
Have to say, I do enjoy SO beans from Columbia.
Cheers,

Dry Bean.

Old age and treachery always overcomes youth and skill. (Willie Nelson)

CoffeeParts

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
6 Replies
8341 Views
Last post 07/12/2006, 08:34 PM
by Reschsmooth
12 Replies
6678 Views
Last post 09/12/2006, 12:53 PM
by askthe coffeeguy
1 Replies
2977 Views
Last post 14/12/2008, 03:43 PM
by askthe coffeeguy
4 Replies
5202 Views
Last post 07/04/2006, 11:52 AM
by Lovey
5 Replies
6037 Views
Last post 26/10/2011, 10:51 PM
by Koffee Kosmo

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk