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BeanGreen

Author Topic: Not Coffee - Well Roasting yes.  (Read 6485 times)

AngerManagement

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Not Coffee - Well Roasting yes.
« on: 22/04/2011, 11:07 PM »
Errr Sort of....

Picked up about 8 to 10 kg of pecan nuts today...

Tried cracking a few and fresh were OK....

Now if one was to roast in the KKTO...  Does one leave them in the shell or remove and roast the nut flesh to get that extra bite ?

All comments welcome.



WotB

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Not Coffee - Well Roasting yes.
« Reply #1 on: 22/04/2011, 11:17 PM »
I think you have to let the pecans dry out a little before shelling?

I remember having to do the same with walnuts.  Similar beasties.

Koffee Kosmo

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« Reply #2 on: 23/04/2011, 12:13 AM »
Pre heat your KKTO at 185 deg C
Add 500 grams of shelled Pecans
Roast for 9 minutes while agitating
Cool

On my tests 185 deg was a perfect temp
Its easy

KK
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askthe coffeeguy

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« Reply #3 on: 23/04/2011, 04:55 AM »
What about cacao beans - I've still got some wild harvested balinese organic ones - and I've been curious about how to roast and what to do with them afterwards?
"The crema which dissipates is not the lasting crema..."

Koffee Kosmo

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« Reply #4 on: 23/04/2011, 08:38 AM »
What about cacao beans - I've still got some wild harvested balinese organic ones - and I've been curious about how to roast and what to do with them afterwards?

I have never tried roasting cacao nibs
That would be an interesting experiment
I suppose it could be done however you will need to check at what temp & length  they like to be roasted ect

Dont they expel a sticky goo near the end of the roast ?
Even so your roaster can be easily washed

I will do a little research
http://www.sweetmarias.com/cocoa.php

KK
Bezzera Strega Lever: Mazzer Robur conical grinder Pullman Barista Tamper Convex:  Designer of the KKTO Home Roaster:

Blog - http://koffeekosmo.blogspot.com

CodyDeegan

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« Reply #5 on: 03/08/2011, 10:54 AM »
I was thinking of roasting the cacao beans but i decided not too because i doubt that it might turn into awful experiment..ill do some reading first before doing so

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« Reply #6 on: 03/08/2011, 01:27 PM »
I had a brief read into that once, and cacoa bean roasting and processing seems to be a whole different ballgame, with lot's of gooey stuff, fancy equipment and a lot more complicated than coffee.

Graham

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« Reply #7 on: 18/08/2011, 05:38 AM »
I was thinking of roasting the cacao beans but i decided not too because i doubt that it might turn into awful experiment..ill do some reading first before doing so

I've roasted a bit of cacao and used this as my main reference.

http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/roasting.php

To get a super smooth commercial style chocolate does require something like the santha grinder detailed in that info. However, I have gotten tasty (if a little gritty) results with nothing more complex than a food processor. Once you have roasted, cracked & winnowed the cacao, you can throw the nibs into the food processor and carefully process them until you get cocoa liquor.

At this stage, I usually add the finest/most powdered sugar I can find until you are happy with the level of sweetness, then I add some crushed nuts of some description to try and mask the slightly sandy texture I often end up with. Once I'm happy with the taste of the resulting liquor, I spoon the mix out onto a greased tray in little truffle balls. Into the fridge to set!

To achieve the gloss & snap of commercial chocolate you need to conch it until the liquor is completely smooth and then temper the resulting liquor. To be honest I'm a little too impatient, and find the cocoa liquor even at an early stage far too deelicious to be bothered with any of that. Once I can get sugar & nuts into it I find it hard to not just sit there with the food processor bowl and eat the whole lot with a spoon!

Miss Silvia + K10WBC & Abid CCD + Mahlkonig Vario = home deliciousness

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« Reply #8 on: 18/08/2011, 07:31 AM »
To get a super smooth commercial style chocolate does require something like the santha grinder detailed in that info. However, I have gotten tasty (if a little gritty) results with nothing more complex than a food processor. Once you have roasted, cracked & winnowed the cacao, you can throw the nibs into the food processor and carefully process them until you get cocoa liquor.

Have you ever tried stone milling it with a mortar and pestle after the food processor to get it smoother? I'd be interested in doing it myself, but not if it's gritty.
Bezzera Mitica, Mazzer Super Jolly, Behmor 1600, Pullman Deluxe Tamper

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« Reply #9 on: 18/08/2011, 08:26 PM »
Have you ever tried stone milling it with a mortar and pestle after the food processor to get it smoother? I'd be interested in doing it myself, but not if it's gritty.

yes, but I won't be doing it again. The cocoa liquor is very messy and I much prefer to keep it contained in something like the food processor bowl.

The slightly gritty texture I've always gotten is more to do with poor selection of sugar and my own impatience. If you're going to roast half a kilo you may as well set aside the better part of a day to crack, winnow & process the resulting nibs. I just get bored of it after a while and want to eat chocolate!

Don't be discouraged, it really IS a lot of fun and well worth doing.
Miss Silvia + K10WBC & Abid CCD + Mahlkonig Vario = home deliciousness

Bezzera

 

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